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Full text of "Prospectus of the Ontario College of Art: 1947-1948"



PROSPECTUS 



OF THE ONTARIO 



COLLEGE OF ART 



1 94 1 - 1 94 8 



PROSPECTUS 



OF THE ONTARIO 



COLLEGE OF ART 



1947 - 1948 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

The Ontario College of Art & Design - University of Toronto Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/prospectusofont4748onta 



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ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART 



COUNCIL 

Fred. H. Brigden, r.c.a., o.s.a., Chairman 

F. S. Rutherford, b.sc, Vice-Chairman H. J. Fairhead, Honorary-Treasurer 

Fred. S. Haines, r.c.a., o.s.a., Secretary 



J. B. Langley, m.r.a.i.c. 
Peter Brieger, ph.d. 

H. J. Fairhead 



William Alexander 
John Bird 



Mrs. de Bruno Austin 
Martin Baldwin, b.sc. 
Fred. H. Brigden, r.c.a., o.s.a. 

Kenneth K. Forbes, r.c.a., o.s.a. 



E. A. Hardy, o.b.e., d.paed. 

F. H. MARANI, O.B.E., F.R.A.I.C, A. R.C.A. 

H. L. Rous 

J. Ardagh Scythes 
J. I. Simpson J. F. M. Stewart, b.a. 

John Westren Melville White 



Chas. Goldhamer, o.s.a. 
H. S. Palmer, r.c.a., o.s.a. 
F. S. Rutherford, b.sc. 

F. G. Rolph 
Mrs. O. D. Vaughan 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Fred. S. Haines, r.c.a., o.s.a Principal 

Roberta Murby Registrar 

Fredda Kelly Secretary to the Principal 

Amy Despard Librarian 

W. M. Mounfield Business Administrator 

Telephone Elgin 2972 






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ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART 



FOREWORD 

HISTORY. — This year the Ontario Society of Artists celebrates its 
seventy -fifth Anniversary — an event of great significance to the Ontario 
College of Art, since one of the first acts of that corporate body was to 
organize an art school. It was successively known as the Ontario School 
of Art y the Toronto School of Art, the Central School of Fine and Indus- 
trial Art, until a provincial charter was granted to it in 1912 as the Ontario 
College of Art. The College occupied various premises until the Government 
erected the present building in Grange Park in 1921. This was fairly 
adequate for the work of the College, until, under the stimulus of the 
Government a fuller programme was inaugurated in 19^5. In order to 
accommodate these increased classes, it was necessary to have more room, 
and a building on Nassau Street was acquired to fill the temporary need. 
It is hoped when costs become more reasonable that the College will 
extend its building at Grange Park bringing all activity under one roof. 

AIMS and OBJECTS. — Our object is to produce artists, designers and 
craftsmen, fully equipped after a four year diploma course, to enter 
any of the Fine, Graphic or Industrial Arts. We feel it is impossible to 
design specific articles without knowing how these articles are constructed. 



Today it is increasingly important that designers know not only how 

objects are created by hand, but also how they ore produced in quantity by 
the machine. With this end in riew we hare opened workshops in Wood- 
working, Pottery, Textiles, Metal Work, and Leathercraft. It is our belief 

that a </ronp of energetic and creative painters, designers and craftsmen 
working together after this training, could translate our flora and f anna, 
our Canadian environment into an unique artistic idiom. Realizing its 
potentialities as the visual laboratory for industry, Canadian manufac- 
turers are increasingly supporting the College with scholarships for our 
students and employment for graduates. 

Fred. S. Haines. 



DESIGN SCHOOL, NASSAU STREET 





OUTLINE OF COURSES 

First Year Basic page 8 

Drawing and Painting " 10 

Commercial Art " 12 

Design " 14 

Interior Architecture " 16 

Sculpture "18 

Etching, Drypoints, Aquatints " 20 

Students' Work . " 21-28 

Pottery " 29 

Design in Wood " 30 

Textiles "31 

Metalwork and Jewellery Design " 32 

Research Studies " 33 

General Information " 34 

Calendar — Terms of Admission " 37 

Fees "38 

Teaching Staff "39 

Awards and Scholarships " 43 




Basic Year modelling class. 

BASIC TRAINING 

directed by Sydney H. Watson, O.S.A. 



This introductory course provides intensive training in drawing and the 
fundamentals of art appreciation and practice and acquaints the student 
with the high standards of the professional fields of artistic endeavour 
by which he can assess his ability to proceed into a specialized field. 

Each subject is developed through progressive exercises from the ele- 
mentary to the more advanced conception thus providing a sound training 
in observation, historical background, research from his own environment, 
compositional analysis and synthesis and a knowledge of form; all basic 
requirements for his acceptance into a specialist course. 

ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING. The handling and care of instruments; free- 
hand and mechanical perspective drawing applied to basic architectural 
forms of our environment and the study of shades, shadows and reflections. 

COLOUR. Exploration of the expressive and representational aspects of 
colour through a study of light and colour intensity, area shape, placement 
and perspective and a survey of colour systems. 

COMPOSITION. A study of spatial relationships, pattern, planes, move- 
ment, contrast, texture and rhythm, devoting the last third of the term to 
three-dimensional composition. 



DESIGN. Investigation of the power of the simple line and form relation- 
ship of line and areas in the division of two and three-dimensional space; 
the system of repeat pattern and applied design to all industries. 

DRAWING. Commencing with the three-dimensional forms, the cube, 
sphere, cone, cylinder and pyramid studies are made in pure line, expressive 
line and value, at first separately and later in combination, progressing 
gradually from the simpler objects of everyday life, into the study of mass 
in the costumed figure in the later stages. 

LETTERING. To arouse an appreciation of lettering as a creative work while 
building an intelligible basis for future exploration into the many lettering 
forms. 

LIFE. Analysis of the human figure stressing rhythm, action proportion and 
the development of form, concluding with the elements of anatomy. 

MODELLING. To develop an appreciation and understanding of three- 
dimensional form. 

RESEARCH I. To develop a method of doing analytical research on the 
historic works of man and thus build up a keen interest in relating tra- 
ditional ornament, decorative design and pattern to the society which 
developed it, using the material thus acquired as the basis for composi- 
tional projects. 

RESEARCH II. To learn to gather documentary material on the contemporary 
environment and materials for a specific purpose, and to develop self-reliance 
and a sense of responsibility by working on-the-spot, in public, under less 
favourable conditions to those found in the studio. 



After he has completed his Basic 
Training, this student will select 
one of the nine Courses des- 
cribed in the following pages. 





Painting from life. 



DRAWING AND PAINTING 

directed by George Pepper, A.R.C.A., O.S.A. 

The drawing and painting course is designed to develop artists of sound 
ability and of high aesthetic standards. The essential requirements for 
success in the course are natural ability, self -discipline and diligence. The 
student is led through a series of steps, from simple problems to those of 
greater complexity, as knowledge and skill increase, which culminate in 
the painting of the figure. 

DRAWING. Emphasis is placed on drawing, especially from the life model 
and the costumed figure. Direct drawings with the pen are made to develop a 
sensitive, expressive line. Tone drawing is studied as an approach to painting. 

STILL- LIFE. Beginning with the second year, still-life groups are painted 
in both oils and water-colour, for the study of colour, tone and texture. 

COSTUME. The costumed figure is painted by third and fourth year students. 

PORTRAIT. Third and fourth year students paint portraits of models 
selected for their diversity of types. 

LIFE PAINTING. Beginning in the third year, students paint from the 
life model. The aim is to achieve complete realisation of form through 
line, tone and colour. 



COMPOSITION. The art of organizing imaginatively the pictorial 
elements in a picture is stressed throughout the course. Students of all 
years are required to submit\for criticism a composition every week. In 
this work they will apply the principles learned through the study of the 
finest compositions of the great schools of painting. 

MURAL PAINTING. In line with the growing public interest in Mural 
painting, instruction is provided for qualified students in the historical 
background of the subject, the theory of traditional methods and their 
practical application under modern conditions. 

MUSEUM STUDY. An appreciation of good form and style is cultivated 
through the study of outstanding examples of the art of past civilizations. 

TECHNIQUES AND MATERIALS. Sound technical knowledge is essential 
for the artist in order that his picture may have lasting worth. The student 
is given, through lectures and practical exercises, a thorough understanding 
of the materials he uses, pigments, oils, resins, emulsions, etc. He is taught 
how to prepare his own grounds for painting, and how to carry his work 
through to completion in oil, egg tempera, or 'mixed technique'. 

OPTIONAL SUBJECTS. Students are required to study either modelling 
or etching as an adjunct to their course. 

OUTDOOR CLASSES. When weather permits, certain classes in drawing 
and painting are held out of doors. On a few occasions during the school 
year, classes go into the country for the painting of landscape subjects. 



Composition Class. 



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COMMERCIAL ART 

directed by Fred Finley, O.S.A. 

The variety and intensity of training in this course is designed to fit the 
graduating student for an immediate place in the field of Commercial Art. 
Instruction not only includes the necessary art training and a study of repro- 
duction methods, but also a comprehensive survey of Advertising as a whole. 
This preparation has the advantage of making less obstrusive the distinc- 
tion between learning and doing, between the problem of completing a 
class assignment and that of producing a piece of work acceptable to tin- 
Art Buyer. 

FIGURE DRAWING. Drawing from life in line, tone and colour. Lectures 
and demonstrations to illustrate the influence of anatomy on exterior forms. 

LETTERING AND TYPOGRAPHY. The basic letter forms and the alphabets 
derived from them. The understanding and use of modern type faces. 

12 ADVERTISING LAYOUT. Included in this subject are: 

a. A. survey of Advertising, its purpose, its importance. 

b. The merchandising problem. Customer research. 

c. The preparation of advertising layouts. Sales ideas and techniques. 



Condiiions approximate those of the Commercial Studio. 




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Students see practical demon- 
strations of all processes of 
photo-engraving. 




d. Direct Mail Advertising. Booklets, folders, Campaign planning. 

e. The processes of reproduction. This study is furthered by tours of 
Photo-engraving plants where each student is given the opportunity to 
see a demonstration of the process for which his class assignments are 
being drawn. 

ILLUSTRATION. Elements of structure, action, movement, expression. The 
study of folds and textures. Principles of composition. Techniques and 1 

work in the following mediums: pen, dry brush, scratch-board, coquil- 
board, pencil, crayon, wash, watercolour, gouache and coloured inks. 

DESIGN. The creation and production of repeat patterns and their appli- 
cation to problems of modern packaging. Instruction in methods employed 
in preparing the designs for reproduction. 

COLOUR THEORY AND PRACTICE. Problems based on the Munsell Sys- 
tem give the student the colour background necessary for his subsequent 
work in design and illustration. 

MECHANICAL DRAWING. Setting up buildings, furniture and other ob- 
jects in perspective and rendering them for reproduction in various mediums. 

MUSEUM RESEARCH. The study of Costume against the background of 
Man's social history. Research designed to stimulate the creative processes 
of the student. 

WORKSHOP PRACTICE. The production of working drawings under work- 
shop conditions. In this period the student carries to conclusion, projects 
planned in the layout and lettering periods. 



14 





Design class. 



DESIGN 

directed by John Martin 



This course pertains to no particular field of applied design, but, through 
the application of the fundamental principles of proportion, rhythm and 
balance, covers practically all known usages. The graduate from this 
course will enter the field of design with a sound knowledge of what design 
is, and of how to apply it in industry. 

GENERAL APPRECIATION OF DESIGN. From his preliminary work in the 
basic year the second year student is directed towards a general appreciation 
of design and its industrial application. 

FIELDS OF DESIGN. The fields of design for printing, weaving, architec- 
ture, book design, jewellery and metal-work are given primary exploration. 

LETTERING. Study is supported by instruction in traditional letter forms 
such as Roman and the Gothics. 



COLOUR THEORY AND PRACTICE based on the Munsell System to give 
the student the necessary background for his subsequent work. 

COSTUME is dealt with in museum research and in the study of con- 
temporary materials. 

LIFE DRAWING. The study of the structure proportions and forms of 
the human figure. 

DRAWING AND PAINTING are included in the third year during which the 
student will study the media in which the design will actually be produced. 

PRACTICAL WORK. Some practical work will be done in the preparation 
of printed fabric, pottery decoration, wall paper, etc. Work will also be 
done in theatre decoration, costume and fresco in miniature. 

THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN will be explored. Only students of the 
highest standing will be passed into the fourth and final year. 

TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT. From this time on, the student will 
devote himself to technological and aesthetic development. He will give 
the final polish to his techniques in design, colour, and application. 

Thus prepared, the student may enter the industrial field fully confident 
of himself as a designer. 



15 



Design applied to various class 
projects. 





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Design for a modern interior. 



INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE 

directed by Gustav Hahn, R.C.A., O.S.A. 



16 



The purpose of this intensive course is to provide a thorough training in 
the fundamentals of architectural design for the student who shows a 
natural capacity for creative work and a susceptibility to new ideas, as a 
basis for the creative study of the complete contemporary interior, both 
domestic and industrial. 

The students' prime consideration is to learn how to co-ordinate his think- 
ing, his work, and his time in order to develop the facility to collaborate 
with architects, clients, technicians and workmen. 

All aspects of his work from the initial steps of research and visualization, 
right through the progressive stages of theme development, rendering and 
detailing up to the final presentation with specifications, working drawings, 
blueprints and models, are presented in a manner that stimulates initiative 
and a deep sense of personal responsibility. 

ARCHITECTURAL CONSTRUCTION. Basic terminology; elementary archi- 
tectural drawing; measured drawings to scale; full sized working drawings; 
mouldings; ornament and materials. 

FURNITURE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. Workshop projects; working 
drawings; anatomy related to furniture construction. 

HISTORICAL RESEARCH. To develop a discreet appreciation of tra- 
ditional work through lectures, prescribed reading, essays, measured draw- 
ings from Museums, interior renderings and first-hand contacts with fine 
architectural examples and documents. 



PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS. Practical survey of related trades to observe 
manufacturing limitations, and business procedure; a study of client 
relations. 

CONTEMPORARY INTERIOR DESIGN. On-the-spot research trips, lectures 
by professional experts in lighting, textiles, furniture, upholstery, glass, 
wallpaper and plaster; detailed interior designs based on plans and ele- 
vations to develop a knowledge of space composition; essentials of mer- 
chandise display. 

THREE DIMENSIONAL DESIGN. Architectural realization of space com- 
position. 

FLAT DESIGN. To study the qualities of motion, time and emotions in the 
division of two-dimensional space related to textiles, rugs, wallpaper, 
tiles, leather and linoleum, and its application to furniture and upholstery. 

COLOUR. First year theory in separate class; second and third years 
colour psychology in lecture form with application in interior designs. 

LIFE DRAWING. Stressing proportion, anatomy and the figure in design, 
two years only. 

FREE RENDERING. In ink, gouache and watercolour, 2nd and 3rd years. 

PERSPECTIVE. Applied to interior and furniture renderings. 



17 



Interior architecture class. 



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Sculpture studio. 



18 



SCULPTURE 

directed by Emanuel Hahn, R.C.A., S.S.C. 



The object of this course is first, to lead the student to professional standing 
in the fine arts and the application of sculptured form to the needs of industry ; 
second, to develop a knowledge of form fundamental to the arts in general 
and the crafts. 

In order to accomplish these aims, the student is directed to an understand- 
ing of the problems, principles and materials of sculpture. He will be 
taught the structure of living things and the techniques of sculpture in the 
round and in relief. While the training he receives will prepare him for a 
career in Fine Art, he will not neglect the possibilities of the industrial field. 
Stress is laid on the needs of the various trades for sculptural models. 
Problems are set, along with assignments for making models to serve specific, 
practical purposes. Mechanical facilities are provided for carrying out 
these experimental projects in their final materials. 

Instruction is given in the following subjects: 

ARMATURES. The methods and materials of armature building. 



MATERIALS. A thorough exploration of the properties and possibilities of 
the sculptor's materials both traditional and modern. 

MODELLING FROM LIFE. After the basic first year training in three 
dimensional form, the student begins to model the figure in clay from the 
life model. 

ANATOMY. The series of Lectures in Anatomy is compulsory for all 
students of sculpture. 

STRUCTURE. Coincident with the Anatomy instruction is the study of the 
human structure in relation to outward form and movement. 

MOULDING AND CASTING, (a) Plaster waste moulds (b) Moulding for 
multiple reproduction in plaster, gelatine, latex (rubber) etc. (c) The Lost 
wax process (d) Papier Mache (e) Sand moulding and metal casting. 

ADVANCED STUDENTS. In order to develop and encourage creative 
talent, third and fourth year students are allowed greater freedom of ex- 
pression and choice of subject matter and material for their assignments. 
Time allowances and manner of instruction and criticism are adapted to 
individual needs as they arise. 



19 



Industrial sculpture and archi 
tectural ornament. 




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The efching studio. 



ETCHING, DRYPOINT, AQUATINT 

directed by Nicholas Hornyansky, A.R.C.A., O.S.A. 

This course embodies all the techniques of intaglio plate making. Advanced 
students exhibit with the senior printmaker society of Canada and take part 
in its coast-to-coast travelling exhibitions. A recently organized collection 
of prints produced in this course is now touring a number of Provincial 
I [J Libraries. 

PREPARATION OF GRAPHIC MATERIAL in the tradition of the medium 
to be employed. 

GROUNDING THE PLATE. Experiments in the use of the various grounds, 
wax grounds, resin dusted grounds for aquatints, etc. 

BITING THE PLATE. Research into the properties of mordants used. 

THE PROCESSES. Etching, Drypoint, Softground, Aquatint, Colour Aqua- 
tint, Gravure, Engraving. 

TECHNICAL ACCESSORIES. Students are taught to make various techni- 
cal accessories such as Etching and soft grounds, Varnished, hand-made 
blacks, adaptable hand wipe tonal inks and multicolour printing inks. 

As print and plate making stands midway between pictorial fine art and 
the crafts, the newly introduced Duplicraft method allows the imprinting 
of specially etched plates onto leather, felt, textiles, and plastics, the 
transprint of relief etching decoration on metal and the transfer of etched 
adornments onto ceramics. 



BASIC YEAR 



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POTTERY, METALWORK, JEWELLERY AND 
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POTTERY 

directed by Gladys Montgomery 

Throughout the ages Pottery has been an important part of everyday living. 
The object of this course is to train the student in the craftsmanship of this 
ancient art and to give him an outlet for his creative spirit in the production 
of articles of usefulness and beauty. 

Instruction in the Pottery course includes: 

DRAWING, THEORY OF COLOUR. For the understanding of form, colour 
and texture as related to ceramics. 



29 



DESIGN AND FUNCTION. Investigation of the function. Developing the 
design out of the function. 

HISTORY OF POTTERY. Museum Study. 

THE PREPARATION OF CLAY. Coiling and hand building, tooling and 
throwing on the potter's wheel. 

TECHNICAL RESEARCH of clays and glazes, since understanding of the 
nature and potentialities of various ceramic materials is essential. 



THE KILN. Stacking and firing. 



30 



DESIGN IN WOOD 

directed by Gordon Yearsley 

The graduate will be qualified to enter the furniture industry as a designer, 
lie will be competent to design furniture or built-in equipment for homes, 
factories and public buildings. He will understand materials, technical 
problems, and production methods. He will be able to make perspective 
drawings in colour for his client, mechanical drawings for the craftsman, 
and to estimate costs. 

BASIC FURNITURE STRUCTURE, (a) Cabinet (b) Chair Making. 

TRADITIONAL FURNITURE. History and Design. 

FURNITURE DESIGN FOR CUSTOM TRADE. Comparison of hand methods 
and production technique in relation to cost. 

FURNITURE DESIGN FOR MASS PRODUCTION. Study of production 
methods and shop practice. 

MODERN METHODS AND MATERIALS. Moulded plywood and plastics. 
Contemporary design and built-in furniture. 

UPHOLSTERY FRAMING AND UPHOLSTERY— FINISHING, COLOURING 
AND SURFACING. In addition to the practical training, the student will 
receive instruction in life drawing, mechanical drawing, perspective, colour, 
three-dimensional design and a study of fabrics. 

Workshop facilities include the most modern woodworking equipment. 




The workshop is equipped with 
the finest of modern power 
machines. 




There is a loom for every student. 



TEXTILES 

directed by Wanda Nelles. 

In the Textile Course theory and practice are combined to prepare the 
student to contribute to the industrial and commercial field as well as to 
create individual objects of utility and beauty. 

Instruction is given in the following subjects in the order shown : 

INTRODUCTION TO WEAVING. The study of equipment and counter- 
balanced looms. Yarn construction, textures, natural and synthetic yarns 
and warping. 

PREPARATION OF LOOM. Basic weaves, Project in cotton, covering simple 
method of design. Project of woven colour, spectrum. Project in wool of 
designed stripe and plaid, including cord weaves and tapestry technique. 
Tweed project using twills and derivatives. 

RELATIONSHIP TO INDUSTRY. Research in Mills. Linen project covering 
ornamental techniques. Cotton project with alternately coloured warp 
yarns for double width, circular derivatives and all possible variations. 
Linen weaves. Cotton pattern weaving, weft design. Rug samples all pile, 
semi-pile and flat surface designs. Tweed yardage in composition of colours. 

ADVANCED TEXTILE DESIGN. Sectional warpings, fly shuttles, damask 
weaves, printed warps, drapery fabrics, upholsteries. 



31 



32 



METALWORK AND JEWELLERY DESIGN 

directed by Harold G. Stacey 

The purpose of this course is to develop designers and craftsmen in the 
separate fields of general decorative metal-work and of jewellery or in a 
combination of both. The graduate will thoroughly understand the tech- 
niques of metal-working and an appreciation of good design and fine 
workmanship. 

HISTORICAL RESEARCH. The tradition and development of the craft. 

MODELLING. Mechanical and freehand drawing. Appreciation of 
the problems of form. 

THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN. The construction of models. 

MATERIALS. Investigation of the properties of the various metals and 
their alloys. 

EQUIPMENT. The use and care of hand and power tools. 

METHODS. Shaping, forming and cutting metals including elementary 
presswork and casting. 

DECORATIVE TREATMENTS. Etching, chassing, repousse, enamelling, plat- 
ing and colouring. 

STONE CUTTING AND POLISHING. 



Theory and Practice, design 
and execution go hand in hand. 




MUSEUM RESEARCH STUDIES 

directed by Miss Ruth Home, M.A. 

A course of lectures designed to provide a classical background to the various 
art courses offered by the College to direct research into the traditional works 
of man and to stimulate the creative processes of the student. 

In the basic year the lectures are of a general nature to serve as a basis for 
future specialization. In the later years lectures and research are directed 
towards the specialist fields. Research studies throughout the entire course 
consist of a one hour lecture a week followed by research under the combined 
supervision of the lecturer and the Department in which the student is 
specializing. 

The material covered in the lectures is as follows: 

CULTURES OF THE MEDITERRANEAN; Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece and 
Rome. Reference will be made to repeat patterns, architecture, sculpture, 
pottery, textiles and furniture. 

MATERIAL CULTURES OF BYZANTIUM, The Near East and Europe from 
the 5th Century, A.D. until 1500 A.D. 

Material cultures of Europe and the Western Hemisphere from 1500 until 
modern times. 

The primitive peoples of the world. 

The cultures of India, China and Japan. 



33 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



34 



The Ontario College of Art (formerly The Central Ontario School of Art 
and Design, which was founded in 1876) was incorporated by Act of the 
Provincial Parliament in 1912. 

The government of the College is entrusted to a Council; the majority is 
appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council, and the rest by various 
Provincial organizations interested in Art. 

THE CLASSES. Day classes for the general session are open to men and 
women students. Intending students are requested to give particulars of 
age, education and previous training in art. They must present satisfactory 
evidence of their interest and ability. It cannot be too highly stressed 
that students must have an absorbing interest in art and a capacity for 
hard work. 

SPECIAL CLASSES. EVENING CLASSES in portrait painting are conduc- 
ted on Monday, Wednesday and Friday evenings, 7.30 to 9.30 by F. S. 
Challener, R.C.A., O.S.A. 

PORTRAIT PAINTING: A portrait painting class for professional artists is 
held on Saturday afternoons 2.00 to 5.00 p.m. under Archibald Barnes, 
R.C.A., O.S.A. 

SCULPTURE: Evening classes in sculpture are conducted on Tuesday and 
Thursday evenings, 7.30 to 9.30 by Emanuel Hahn, R.C.A., S.S.C. 

BOOKBINDING: Instruction in bookbinding in its various forms and 
materials is given by Miss Amy Despard. 

LEATHERWORK: Instruction in tooling, modelling and manipulation of all 
types of leather, pattern making, and projects involving a combination 
of leather with metal or wood are given to special groups by Miss Frances Neil. 
Further information concerning the above special classes may be obtained 
by application to the Registrar. 

POST-GRADUATE COURSE. Post-Graduate courses are free to graduates 
of the College. The course must be taken in the year immediately following 



the student's graduation year. The graduate, subject to the approval of 
the Principal, will decide upon the programme of work to be pursued. This 
period of study is considered by the College to be mainly one of practical 
effort on the part of the graduate about to enter professional life. The 
necessity to further develop technical ability is stressed upon the graduate 
and his work is arranged with that point in view. 

LECTURES. Through the College year lectures are given on the following 
subjects: The Technique and Materials of Painting, Artistic Anatomy, 
Architecture, Design, and Advertising. 

THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM. Lectures and Research Studies under 
the direction of Miss Ruth Home, M.A., assisted by Mrs. Dorothy Hoover, 
B.A., take place at the Royal Ontario Museum, one of the world's greatest 
museums. There the student is extended the privilege of intimate study 
where he may come in fruitful contact with the great art of the past. The 
famous Chinese Collection is a storehouse to thrill the student, and the 
varied collections of art objects and specimens of natural history make 
the museum one of the most prized fields of art study. 

THE ART GALLERY OF TORONTO, next door to the College, has a fine 
permanent collection of Art which, together with the many periodical 
exhibitions of painting and sculpture, offers the student an unrivalled 
opportunity to study the works of the masters as well as those of the great 
contemporaries. 

THE COLLEGE LIBRARY contains a valuable collection of Art books and 
periodicals available for study and reference. The College welcomes con- 
tributions to its Library, such as that of Scythes and Company Limited, 
which is an annual gift of up to Six Hundred Dollars a year for the purchase 
of reference books on Art subjects. 

AWARDS. The College awards Diplomas of Associates of the College, 
Scholarships and Prizes arranged for and posted in the College for com- 
petition, and Certificates. These are regulated as follows: 

The Governor-General's Medal is awarded each year for general proficiency 
in advanced work, or in one particular subject. 



35 



The Lieutenant-Governor's Medal is awarded each year \'<>v Proficiency in 
any Department. 

Ontario College of Art Medal: is awarded each year to students of out- 
standing merit. 

SCHOLARSHIPS: for free tuition in the College are awarded to students in 
First, Second and Third Years. 

DIPLOMAS OF ASSOCIATESHIP OF THE COLLEGE: authorizing the use 
of the letters A.O.C.A. after the names of the holders, are awarded upon 
completion of a four year course, covering one or more of the ten Depart- 
ments of the College, provided the student has fulfilled all conditions of 
the course, and that a satisfactory standard of quality has been achieved. 
All awards are made by judgment of the Staff sitting as a Board, and all 
such awards are made upon the basis of work done by the student during 
the year, and results gained in examinations, both practical and written. 



36 STUDENT ACTIVITIES 



THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART STUDENTS' CLUB: This is a student 
organization for the development of the student social life within the College. 
It undertakes the supervision and upkeep of the Student's Common Room 
and arranges all social affairs, dances, student exhibitions, theatrical enter- 
tainments and dinners. A notable and artistic annual event is the College 
Masquerade Ball conceived and designed in its entirety by the student 
body. The ball-room is decorated and costumes designed in the styles of a 
chosen period; the work being done as a class problem in design and colour, 
mural decoration and applied art. 

TOURING EXHIBITION: A recently organized exhibition of prints produced 
by the students of the Etching course under Mr. Hornyansky is now 
touring on a Provincial Library chain, built up and managed by the students. 

CAFETERIA AND COMMON ROOM: A cafeteria is operated where 
students may obtain lunch and refreshments at moderate prices. The 
cafeteria is open every school day. It is in close connection with the 
Students' Common Room which is under the management of the Students' 
Club and has been furnished and maintained bv them. 



CALENDAR FOR YEAR 1947-1948 

DAY COURSES— ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART 

First Term begins September c 29th, 1947 

Closes January 31st, 1948 

Second Term begins February 1st, 1948 

Closes May 31st, 1948 

Registration Week — September 22nd to 26 inclusive. 

HOLIDAYS 

Thanksgiving — From Friday before Thanksgiving until the following 
Tuesday. 

Christmas — From December 20th, 1947 until January 5th, 1948. 

Easter — From Thursday before Good Friday until the following Tuesday, 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 



37 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 

1. Students are admitted on an implicit 
understanding that they will be of good 
behaviour, will work as directed, be regular 
and punctual in attendance, observe all 
regulations, posted or announced, and pre- 
sent themselves for examinations relating to 
their courses. 

2. The Principal may suspend any student 
whose conduct or influence appears to be 
injurious to the discipline and interest of 
the College. 

3. In the case of absence, from sickness or 
other cause, beyond three days, a communi- 
cation must be sent to the Principal. 

4. The student who has the highest per- 
centage of attendance in the classes of the 
division for which scholarships are offered, 



will have preference when two or more are 
equal in examinations. 

5. Students are not allowed in the College 
at other than working hours without per- 
mission from the Principal. 

6. Only students of the College may enter 
class rooms during working hours, and only 
during recess may students visit class rooms 
other than those where they are working. 

7. No student may alter the prescribed 
course or attend classes of other years with- 
out the sanction of the Principal. 

8. Smoking is not permitted anywhere in 
the College during class hours, but is allowed 
at certain times and places in accordance 
with posted regulations, subject to change 
or cancellation at any time. 



38 



9. Facilities are accorded the student for 
reasonable amusement and recreation. For 
this purpose, committees of the Students' 
Club are given authority to act under the 
general direction of the Principal. 

10. Students desiring to bring guests to the 
dining room, or for any other purpose must 
obtain permission from the Principal. 

11. No work will be exhibited at the monthly 
or annual exhibition which has not been done 
by a student at the College during the year. 

12. The Principal and staff reserve the right 
to retain permanently for the College, prize 
drawings and other works suitable for record, 
example and exhibition. 

13. Fees are payable in advance when the 
student registers and are not returnable. 

14. Fees paid by students whose further 
attendance is prohibited for violation of regu- 
lations are forfeited, and scholarships may 
be cancelled without notice, for non-atten- 
dance or misconduct. 

15. Students must obtain a 90% attendance 
record and fulfil all financial obligations. 

16. Students must turn in 90% of the work 
assigned during the school year. 

17. Former students or persons not regis- 
tered in the College must not make use of 
the College premises without permission of 
the Principal. 

18. Any student failing to hand in three 
projects in any subjects will automatically 
forfeit his registration. 

19. Students injuring the property of the 
College will be held responsible. 

20. Students defacing or losing books bor- 
rowed from the College Library must pay 
for the cost of the books so defaced or lost. 



21. The Council of the College cannot be 
held responsible for the custody of the pri- 
vate property of students, nor can any claim 
be entertained in respect of any article left 
in the College. 

22. Day (lasses terminate at t :.'»() p.m. and 
Evening Classes at 9:30p.m. Students musl 
leave the College promptly after classes. 

Day Classes in the College year are divided 
into two terms and all fees are payable 
strictly in advance. Students are expected 
to give careful consideration to their deci- 
sions on entering the College, as fees once 
paid are not returnable. 

DAY COURSES 

(Including Fees for Student's Club Membership* 

For all classes and general 

privileges for one year . . . $100.00 

For all classes and general 

privileges for one term .... $ 50.00 

For six half days per week — 

one term $ 30.00 

NO STUDENT is admitted to classes until 
registration is completed by the payment 
of fees. 

SUPPLIES used during the course may be 
purchased as required at the College store; 
these are sold at cost and during the year 
would amount to about forty-five dollars. 
A fee will be charged in advance for class 
supplies for students of crafts and modelling. 

LOCKERS. Lockers for supplies may be 
secured by students on payment of fifty 
cents per year rental. Lockers will be 
shared by two students. The key must be 
left at the office at the end of the session; 
twenty-five cents will then be returned 
The College is not responsible for property 
in these lockers and all lockers must be 
cleared within one week after the closing 
time. 



STAFF 



PRINCIPAL: FRED S. HAINES, R.C.A., 
O.S.A. Studied at the Central 
Ontario School of Art and Indus- 
trial Design, and L'Academie 
Royale des Beaux Arts d'Anvers, 
Belgium, under de Vriendt and 
Siebert. Past President of the 
Royal Canadian Academy of Arts 
and Past President of the Ontario So- 
ciety of Artists. Honorary Member 
of the Society of Hungarian Painter- 
Etchers, member of Chicago Society 
of Etchers, member of the Painter- 
Gravers of London, England. Repre- 
sented in the National Gallery of 
Canada, Ottawa, the Art Gallery 
of Toronto, Hart House, public col- 
lections at Sarnia and Saskatoon, 
and in many other public and pri- 
vate collections. 

JOHN M. ALFSEN, A.R.C.A., O.S.A. 
Studied at the Ontario College of 
Art, Toronto, L'Academie Royale 
des Beaux Arts d'Anvers, Belgium, 
and the Art Students' League under 
Henry Hayes Miller, New York. 
Is represented in the National Gal- 
lery of Canada, Ottawa, and the 
Art Students' League Gallery, 
New York. 

ARCHIBALD BARNES, R.C.A., O.S.A. 
Studied at St. John Wood and 
Royal Academy Schools, London, 
England. Represented at Hull, 
Huddersfield, Oldham, Manchester, 
Vancouver and Toronto. 



FREDERICK S. CHALLENER, R.C.A., 
O.S.A. Studied at the Central 
Ontario School of Art and Indus- 
trial Design. Represented in the 
National Gallery of Canada, 
Ottawa. Canadian War Memorials 
and Mural Decorations in Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, Winni- 
peg and Edmonton. Medals at Pan 
American Exposition, Buffalo and 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 
St. Louis. 

E. GRACE COOMBS, O.S.A. Gra- 
duate of the Ontario College of Art. 
Studied at the New York School 
of Fine and Applied Arts. Repre- 
sented in Hart House and many 
private collections. 

AMY DESPARD. Graduate of the 
Ontario College of Art. Graduate of 
course in Occupational Therapy at 
the University of Toronto (book- 
binding). Studied at the School of 
Fine and Applied Art, New York 
and in Europe. 

FRED FINLEY, O.S.A. Born in 
Australia. Came to Canada in 
1925. Studied in Australia under 
Julian Ashton, in Paris under Paul 
Albert Laurens and Henri Desche- 
naud, and in Munich under Ludwig 
Angerer. Represented in the 
National Gallery of Canada, 
Ottawa, and in the National Gal- 
lery of New South Wales, Australia. 



39 



40 



ERIC FREIFELD Born in .1911) in 
Russia; early education in Canada. 
Awarded Carnegie Scholarship. 
Studied Art in London, Paris and 
New York. Represented in nu- 
merous collections, including the 
Brookstreet Galleries, New Bond 
Street, British Fine Art Society 
and Solomon Collection. Taught 
at the Vancouver School of Art. 
Member of the Art Students' 
League, New York. 

FRED HAGAN, C.P.E. Studied at 
the Ontario College of Art, Art 
Students' League, New York; 
Lithography under George Miller, 
New York. Formerly Resident 
Artist at Pickering College. Mem- 
ber of Society of Graphic Art. 

EMANUEL HAHN, R.C.A., S.S.C. 
Studied at the Central Ontario 
School of Art and Industrial Design, 
School of Applied Art, Polytech- 
nikum and Academy of Stuttgart, 
Germany. Represented by work 
in the National Gallery of Canada, 
Ottawa. Erected Adam Beck and 
Hanlan Memorials, Toronto and 
others. 

GUSTAV HAHN, R.C.A., O.S.A. 
Graduated from Royal Wurtem- 
berg School of Art and Design, 
Stuttgart, Germany. Studied in 
Munich and Italy. Instructor in 
Modelling and Design in the Cen- 
tral Ontario School of Art and 
Industrial Design. Instructor in 
Design at the Toronto Technical 
School. Executed Interior Decora- 
tion and Murals in The Provincial 
Legislative Chamber, Toronto, in 



Council Chamber, Toronto City 
Hall, and in numerous Churches 
and private houses. 

ROBERT S. HERALD Studied at 
the Arts and Crafts Guild School, 
Berlin, Germany, and later at the 
University of Leeds, England. 
Served with the Canadian Forces. 

RUTH M. HOME, M.A. 1922 B.A. 
Modern History, University of 
Toronto 124 M.A. in Political 
Science. 1928 Lecturer, Royal On- 
tario Museum. 1934 awarded 
Carnegie Fellowship to study Cera- 
mics in England, 1935 Fellowship 
in Far Eastern Art and History, 
Columbia University. 1938 Awar- 
ded the American Association of 
Museum Fellowship for study at 
the Courtaulds Institute of Fine 
Arts. Supervisor of Division of 
Public Instruction, Royal Ontario 
Museum, 1939-194,5. Since 1940 
Lecturer in Department of Fine 
Arts, LTniversity of Toronto. 

DOROTHY HOOVER, B.A. 1924 
Modern History, LTniversity of 
Toronto. 1924-28 Lecturer, Royal 
Ontario Museum. Past member of 
the Canadian Society of Painters in 
Water Colour and Graphic Art 
Society. 

NICHOLAS HORNYANSKY, A.R.C.A. 
O.S.A., C.P.E. Born in Budapest, 
studied al the Academy of Fine 
Arts in Budapest, and later in 
Antwerp and in Holland. Studied 
Colour Aquatint printmaking in 
Paris. Represented in many gal- 
leries and private collections in 
Canada, United Stales and Europe. 



JOHN FREELING HUNT. Studied 
at Ontario College of Art, in Paris 
on Post Graduation Scholarship, 
in Italy, Germany and England on 
Research Scholarship. Joined staff 
of Parson's School of Design in 
1935 as instructor in Interior Design 
and Research. Taught four years 
in Paris, and one year in New York. 
Industrial and Interior Designer in 
New York and Toronto. 

LILY LANGLEY. Studied in Win- 
nipeg School of Art and Ontario 
College of Art. Instructed at 
Teachers' Summer Course, O.C.A. 
and Saturday Morning Classes, 
OCA. 

JOHN MARTIN, O.S.A. Born and 
educated in England. Studied 
design under Professors Needham 
and Hill (Slade Professor) of Not- 
tingham School of Art. Represen- 
ted in many collections in Canada 
and the United States. 

GLADYS MONTGOMERY, Gradu- 
ate of the Ontario College of Art 
and of the Toronto Conservatory 
of Music. Studied pottery under 
Cameron Paulin, and at Alfred 
University. Represented in the 
Syracuse Museum of Art. 

STANLEY G. MOYER Graduate 
of the Ontario College of Art. Later 
studied at Pennsylvania Academy 
of Fine Arts, Philadelphia; National 
Academy of Design and Art Stu- 
dents' League, New York, under 
Luks and Bridgman, and portrai- 



ture under Cecilia Beaux. Awarded 
$500. Fellowship Tiffany Founda- 
tion, Oyster Bay; Suydam Bronze 
Medal for Life Drawing, National 
Academy. 

ROWLEY MURPHY, A.R.C.A., O.S.A. 
Studied Toronto Technical School, 
Ontario College of Art, Pennsyl- 
vania Academy of Fine Arts, Phila- 
delphia, Passed Department of 
Education Teacher's Course 
Hamilton Training College. De- 
signer of Camouflage, Royal Cana- 
dian Navy. Official Royal Cana- 
dian War Artist. Represented in 
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine 
Arts, Philadelphia and National 
Gallery, Ottawa. 

WANDA B. NELLES. Studied 
weaving at Cranbrook Academy of 
Art and with Swedish weaver, Mrs. 
Martina Lindhal at Harland, 
Michigan ; Penland School of Handi- 
crafts and with Anni Albers at 
Black Mountain College, N.S. 

FRANCES NEIL. Graduate of the 
Ontario College of Art. Awarded 
the Governor General's Medal for 
proficiency at her graduation. In- 
structor in Painting at Banff School 
of Fine Arts. 

HARLEY PARKER. Studied at the 
Ontario College of Art under Frank 
Carmichael and at Black Mountain 
College under Joseph Albers. Mem- 
ber Canadian Society of Graphic 
Arts. 



41 



ROBERT MAX NORGATE. G r a - 
duate of the Ontario College of 
Art 1941. Taught in the Art As- 
sociation of Montreal and various 
minor organizations. Later was 
awarded a Scholarship by the Cran- 
brook Academy of Art to study 
there under the Swedish sculptor 
Carl Milles. 

WILL OGILVIE, M.B.E. Studied 
at the Art Students' League, New 
York, under Kimon Nicolaides. 
Member of Canadian Group of 
Painters and Canadian Society of 
Painters in Water Colour. Taught 
Life Composition and Painting at 
the Art Association School Mont- 
real and was Director of the School 
A prior to the outbreak of war. En- 

listed in Canadian Army in 1941. 
Was appointed Official War Artist 
in 1942. Served in the Campaigns 
in Sicily, Italy and North-west 
Europe. Awarded M.B.E. 

GEORGE DOUGLAS PEPPER, A.R.- 
C.A., O.S.A. Studied Ontario 
College of Art, in England, France 
and Italy. Was Publicity Artist 
for the Forest Service of Canada, 
Department of Interior for three 
years. Official War Artist with the 
Canadian Forces Overseas. Rep- 
resented in the National Gallery 
of Canada, The Art Gallery of 
Toronto, the Massey Collection, in 
Hart House, and in the National 
Gallery of South Africa. 

HAROLD G. STACEY. Born in 
Montreal, Quebec. Studied at Cen- 
tral Technical School and with 
Rudy Renzius in Toronto. For 



several years instructed evening 

classes in Metal work at Central 
Technical School in Toronto. 

DONALD CAMPBELL STEWART, 
A.R.C.A., O.S.A., S.S.C. B o r n 
1912 Hamilton, Ontario. Studied 
at Hamilton Technical School with 
John Sloan, Westdale Technical 
School w r ith Ida Hamilton, Ontario 
College of Art with Emanuel Hahn. 
Graduated in Sculpture in 1937 
with Lieutenant-Governor's Medal. 
He maintained a sculptor's work- 
shop in Toronto since 1937. 

SYDNEY H. WATSON, O.S.A. 
Born and educated in Toronto. 
Employed in Advertising Art in 
Toronto. Artist-in-residence, Lake- 
field Prep School 1942-44. Liturgi- 
cal Designer. Director, Canadian 
Society of Painters in Water Colour. 

ERNEST WICKSEY. Studied at 
the Ontario College of Art under 
J. W. Beatty R.C.A. and received 
personal tuition in Lettering and 
Illumination under J. E. H. Mc- 
Donald, R.C.A. Designed illumi- 
nated addresses presented to the 
Duke of Windsor (then the Prince 
of Wales), the Queen of Rumania, 
the Canadian High Commission in 
London, the Lieutenant Governor 
of Ontario and Benito Mussolini. 

GORDON YEARSLEY. Has been 
teaching crafts in schools, camps, 
recreation centres for 12 years. His 
practical experience in the design- 
ing and construction of wood pro- 
ducts makes it possible for him to 
present his subject from the manu- 
facturers point of view. 



A R D S AND SCHOLARSHIPS- 194 6-47 



FIRST YEAR 

Scholarship — Mr. R. S. McLaughlin — One Term Katherine Ross 

Scholarship — Miss Florence Black — One Term Suzanne Mess 

Scholarship — Mr. J. F. M. Stewart — One Term Patricia Harvie 

Scholarship — Mrs. R. S. McLaughlin — One Term Mary Armstrong 

Scholarship— O'Keefe's — One Term Christopher Adeney 

Scholarship — Ontario College of Art — One Term Margaret McMillan 

PRIZES 

Frank Bull Anthony Gasbarini Dorothy Greenberg 

George Nanos Allan Oddy Beryl Perry 

Rolph Pogue William Sloan Gustav Weisman 

Edward Yates 

HONOURS 

Christopher Adeney Donald Hutson Beryl Perry 

Mary Armstrong Barbara King William Peters 

Hugh Brown Samuel Kyba Rolph Pogue 

Frank Bull Robert Lawson Francis Reed 

Gordon Compton June Loucks George Reid 

George Empey Edwin Love Albert Reinhardt 

Anthony Fadelle Jack Lowry Katherine Ross 

Anthony Gasbarini Wallace MacKay Wallace Sheehan 

Roland Gauthier David Maynard William Sloan 

Fred Graham Suzanne Mess Andrew Van Rassel 

Dorothy Greenberg Margaret McMillan Shirley Walker 

William Gregory George Nanos Gustav Weisman 

Lesslie Harting Conrade Nelson Jack Whitfield 

Patricia Harvie Allan Oddy Edward Yates 

Robert Herald 

PASS 

William Abbiss Douglas Goodfellow Arthur McGhie 

Joseph Accette Thomas Gosson W. J. McKillop 

David Aikenhead Barbara Greene Kenneth McMillan 

Margaret Allport Doris Guse Constance McRae 

Elsie Anderson Ronald Harris Frederick McNeely 

Robert Ball W t illiam Hill William Newell 

Russell Battram Joseph Hodgins Della Noble 

Albert Baur Hugh Holmes Douglas Nolan 

Joseph Beirnes Leonard Hope Raye Oesch 

Fern Berenson Rupert Hopkins Gordon O'Rourke 

Douglas Bilbrough Bruce Howard James Passmore 

Marie Blais Leonard Huggard James Pearce 

Reuben Blazer Charles Huke Pamela Pepler 

James Boaz Thomas Janes John Rahkola 

Allan Bowman Helen Johnston Roy Rice 

James Bryant Toivo Kaski Charles Robinson 

William Buckridge Huntley Keillor Edward Robinson 



43 



I\ w Campbell John Kidston Bruce Ri ppell 

Frederick Carrigan Henri Kingdon John Russell 

[da Chaloner George Konkle Ronald Scholes 

Carlyle Chevalier Jack Krantzberg Dorothy Schmidt 

Agnes Chinery Beatrice Lafreniere Joseph Shebk 

Reta Clements Lillian Lafreniere William Sherwood 

John ClIMER Kenneth Lindsay Arthur Simons 

Norman Corke Donna Little Walter Slow 

Arthur Corry Ronald Luetchford Elizabeth Smith 

Thomas Cully John MacDowall Milton Smith 

James Darby Donald Mackenzie Arthik Snelgrove 

Charles Dawe Gordon Mackie John Solaruk 

Rosamond de Camps Desmond Major Joan Sponagle 

Blair Dodson Lorraine Margueratt David Stevenson 

Kenneth Duncan Muriel Margueratt Gordon Swetman 

Marilynn Dymond Edward Markham Elizabeth Tedman 

Robert Easton Edward Matchun Ernest Tremblay 

Douglas Farrell George Meadows Gordon Tyler 

Joseph Fitzsimmons Thomas Merchant Javier Villada 

Robert Forsythe Joan Michener Harry Wade 

Robert Fraser Alexander Millar Margerita Wees 

Fred Gale Francis Milne Frank Weir 

Warren Gale John Moise Barbara Wilkes 

George Gaston Donald McCormack Walter Wright 

Dennis Gauthier Mary McDonald Norman Wynott 

Mary Gerow Murray McDonald Lawrence Zammit 

SECOND YEAR 

Scholarship — Mr. John Westren Scholarship — One Term Nancy Jamieson 

Scholarship — O'Keefe's Scholarship — One Term Ruth McCracken 

Scholarship — International Business Machines — One Term Mary Cane 

Scholarship — Ontario College of Art — One Term Muriel Newton-White 

PRIZES 

Robert Annand William Gee Verna Jacques 

Gary Filewod Gerard Garneau John Muir 

William Clements Sidney Goldsmith Ruby Rogers 

Harry Wetmore 

HONOURS 

Drawing and Painting 

David Anderson William Gee * Albert Palleck 

Robert Annand Bernard McLoughlin Keith Scott 

Commercial Art 

Arthur Alder Gerard Garneau Louis Hartley 

Jack Birdsall John Green Karn Lewis 

Gordon Clarke Sidney Goldsmith Beresford Mitchell 

Herbert Ficht John Goodale John Mi ir 

Garry Filewod Nancy Jamieson 



Harry Bohaychuk 
Mary Cane 
Gladys Clawson 



Design 

MlLBURN CLEARY 

Gordon Diplock 
Alan Olmsted 



Frank Perry 
Alice-Dewart Robinson 
Charles Sheldon- Williams 



John Henry 
Ruth McCracken 



Interior Architecture 
Verna Jacques 

Sculpture 
William Clements 



Ruby Rogers 



Metalwork 
Harry Wetmore 



Douglas Barry 
John Bechtel 
Joan Davidson 
Frederick Down 
Robert Dunne 
Ernest Estey 
Joan Folinsbee 
Richard Howe 



PASS 

D ratting and Painting 

Joseph Landry 
Harold Laxton 
Sidney Ledson 
Anthony Lima 
James Moffatt 
Catherine Munro 
Hugh Murphy 
Muriel Newton- White 



Helen Nixon 
John Pollard 
Jean Pugh 
Lorena Purdy 
Reginald Shepherd 
William Smith 
James Williamson 



45 



SECOND YEAR 



lorne ballance 
Gordon Bell 
Paul Borsos 
Ralph Borchiver 
Ralph Bothwell 
Carol Campbell 
Albert Candy 
Alfred Davidson 
Carl Durban 
Carl Eayrs 
Alfred Elliott 
John Fletcher 
Arm and Flint 
James Gadsden 
Wallace Goulding 
Arthur Griffiths 
Mary Johnston 



PASS 

Commercial Art 

Norman Hathaway 
Walter Hickling 
Russell Hurdman 
Clemens Hutton 
Barbara Kelly 
Donald Kennedy 
Stanley Kinton 
Ernest Little 
And^j MacIntosh 
Alexander McFadyen 
Frank Milnes 
John Neilly 
Shirley Roberts 
Gerard Rostant 
Gerald Scott 
Keith Smith 
Arthur Steven 



Malcolm Storm 
Beryl Studdy 
Herbert Taylor 
James Taylor 
Sydney Taylor 
John Tynski 
George Upper 
Harold Vanstone 
Nan Waller 
Charles Walton 
John Weese 
Lyle Westman 
William Williams 
Rodney Williamson 
William Williamson 
Gordon Winkworth 
Charles Zusi 



Design 



Aktiii u A.LLERTON 
Jean Bannihr 
Leslie Bennett 
William Charlton 
Edward Cumming 

S\\ll ESL DE RlNZY 

Bernard Des Roches 



Frederick Puller 
David GlLLRIE 
Raymond Hughes 
Shirley Kerr 
Dorothy Merrick 
Raymond Mohr 
Anna Patterson 



DWIGHT RlVARD 

Charlotte Ritchie 

Bernard Scott 
j kan surget 
.1 \( qi i.i. im. Worm] ei 
Gladys Verity 



Cecil Alton 
James Bayley 
Beverley Bray 
Elwin Cathcart 
June Demerling 
Bertram Fisher 



Interior Architecture 

Frederick Fisher 
Edward Greenwood 
Carman Harrison 
Donald Lapp 
Allen Lett 
Richard Knowles 



Annah-Jean Meikle 
Ernest Rex 
Nicholas Rom w 
Thomas Swift 
James Thompson- 
Edward F/ngar 



Frederick Brown 
Donald Geary 



Sculpt nte 

Corbett Gray 
Roy Haliburton 



Anne Shields 
Wilfred Stewart 



46 



Frances Hatfield 



Pottery 



Teresa Kidick 



Metalwork 
Scott Darrach 



Hubert Hatfield 



Furniture 
Ian McCallum 



Madeleine Patterson 



Pottery and Textiles 
Jessie Stewart 

Textiles 
Patricia Elliott 

THIRD YEAR 

Scholarship — Mr. R. S. McLaughlin Scholarship — One Term William Wells 

Scholarship — Mrs. R. S. McLaughlin Scholarship — One Term Lois Draper 

Scholarship — O'Keefe's Scholarship — One Term John Richmond 

Scholarship — International Business Machines — One Term Eric de Luz 

Scholarship — Mr. John Westren Scholarship — One Term Helen Parsons 

Scholarship — Ontario College of Art Scholarship — One Term Felicia Rom\ sn\ 

PRIZES 



Arnold Hodgkins 



RUTHANNE SoiTER 



Arnold Hodgkins 



Joan Chalmers 



William Wells 
William Da vies 



HONOURS 

Drawing and Painting 
Helen Parsons 

Sculpture 
Eric de Luz 

In terior A rch itecture 
Margaret Peniston 

Furniture Design 
Ruthanne Souter 

Commercial Art 
Lois Draper 
John Richmond 



Philip Weiss 



Robin W t hyte 



Felicia Robinson 
Kenneth Zealley 



Design 
Joyce Geldart 



Gordon Coyle 
Ronald Darby 
Winston Elliott 
June Forbes 
Hector Greville 
Donald Holden 
Grant Johnston 
Leslie Jones 



Kenneth Dudley 



Kenneth Bilton 
Margaret Caldwell 
Dorothy Campbell 
Roberta Dafoe 



Textiles 
Althea Edgar 

PASS 

Drawing and Painting 
Jewell Kelly 
Ruth Killam 
Joan Lowrie 
Alma McPuroff 
Edward McCormack 
Peter McLean 
Norman Ortiz 
Margaret Roach 

THIRD YEAR 
PASS 

Sculpture 

Interior Architecture 
Harold Rosnick 

Commercial Art 
Frederick Davis 
Hugh Ettles 
Patricia Gibson 
Donolene Griffiths 



47 



Catharine Ross 
Margaret Smith 
Cecilie Swaby 
Ernest Taylor 
Arthur Thorne 
Jacqueline Watts 
Kathleen Williams 



Joseph Rosenthal 



David Hall-Humpherson 
John Maxted 
Mary Peart 
Elmer Rover 



Design 
Albert La Bell John Sdn lath 

Metal Work 
Jane Fisher Joyce Roffey 

FOURTH YEAR 
MEDALS 

Governor-General's Medal for Proficiency in Painting William Thomson 

Lieutenant-Governor's Medal for Proficiency in sculpture William McKi.ciikhw 

Ontario College of Art Medals: 

For Proficiency in Painting John Taylor 

For Proficiency in Interior Architecture Kathleen Johnson 

For Proficiency in Commercial Art Marion MacRae 

For Proficiency in Sculpture Ruthe Winkler 

PRIZES 

Canadian Art Laboratory Prize Frank Sebastiano 

Tommy Kakinuma 

HONOURS 

Drawing and Painting 
Tommy Kakinuma Vernon Mould John Taylor 

Archibald Logan Frank Sebastiano William Thomson 

Arnold Meyers 

Commercial Art 
Marion MacRae 



Sculpture 



William McElcheran 



Ruth Winkler 



Interior Architecture 
Kathleen Johnson 



Design 



Dorothy Webster 



Dorothy W'ilson 



Leonard Amos 
Ralph Ashton 
Dirk Bossen 
Paul Braid 
Mary Gumming 
Hannah Church 



PASS 

Drawing and Painting 
Clark Cunningham 
Haydn Da vies 
Patrick Haldorsen 
Nancy Hall 
m \kgaret hovey 
William Lytle 



Hilary Menzies 
Sam N lrrol 
John O'Henlei 
Arthur Ortiz 
Paul Watt 



mercial Art 



Frederick Martin 



Nelson D \\< >